Thanks for the memories…

It’s always tough leaving a company – one that you’ve committed your time, hard work, and life to.  Whether you’re leaving because you have a new opportunity or because it’s just time, it can be an emotional experience that you may need to process.

“Wow!  What a relief!”

“I’m so excited about what’s next!”

“Holy crap, what was I thinking?!”

“Did I make the right decision?!”

“I have no idea what’s next and I’m nervous terrified…”

Based upon experience, below are just some of my suggestions on the right way to leave, regardless if you are leaving on positive terms or not.  

  • NEVER speak ill of your former company or those working there.  Every work experience will have events and/or people that are frustrating!  However, as you progress in your career, you being to realize “what a small word” it really is and people are more connected then ever.  So, as tempting as it may be to vent or gossip, remember what your mom always said, “if you don’t have something nice to say, don’t say it at all.”
  • Be grateful for your time, your learning, your accomplishments, and anything else that serves you well while you were at the company.  Together, you and the company did some great things together and that’s the memory you want to focus on when looking back upon your career.  You might find that both you and the company are better off as a result of your time together.
  • In the end, your reputation is all you can take with you.  It’s formed by the efforts rendered, the accomplishments achieved, and frankly, how you’ve made people feel along the way.  All of which, can be void immediately, when you behave in a non-professional manner.

Here’s wishing you well on your next adventure… whenever and wherever it may be.  Remind yourself… you’ll do great.

To your continued success…

Do Angel Investors Make Money?

Do Angel investors make money?  An interesting question for sure!  Well, I can tell you from first hand experience that being an angel investor is sexier than it sounds!  It’s not easy, requires a lot of study, and most importantly – time.  So, if you are looking to make a “quick” buck, Angel investing isn’t it – you may have better odds winning the lottery!  What’s even more interesting is that most angels aren’t really qualified to be angels – sure, they have money but they don’t have the knowledge to define what constitutes an investment worth making.  Now, add the ever changing dynamics of the entrepreneurial tech industry and you’ve got variables that can be challenging even for an experienced VC.

The venture capital industry, of which angel investing lives as part of the ecosystem, is very interesting and there is a lot more to it than most people understand.  (To read my posts on becoming a VC, click here.)  Remember, for every Google or Apple, there are 100 companies out there that don’t provide any real returns and that is all factored as part of the “bet” angels (and VCs) have to make.

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Great Expectations…?

Words – in today’s vocabulary, are more powerful than they have ever been in our existence.  Simple letters assembled together have the ability to make you feel like you are on top of the world; or, they can serve as a guillotine and do irreparable damage.

Depending on your intent, words can be used as a tool and if utilized wisely, could lead to one achieving the result they so seek.  Knowing this, the responsibility to learn and choose words carefully, is great and often not treated with the respect it so deserves.

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To MBA or Not To MBA? Part II

So what is the “hidden” value of an MBA program?  My hint, in my previous post said, “it has nothing to do with education”.

Let’s try to look at this objectively.  As part of an MBA curriculum, a student is required to learn the core functions of a business.  Now, depending on the program itself, a student can specialize in a particular subject (e.g. finance), but generally speaking, the program will still need to cover other topics including, but not limited to, HR, Marketing, Finance, Ethics, Economics, and Strategy thereby providing the student with a broad knowledge base needed to operate a company.  So, regardless of whether you go to Columbia, Berkeley, Stanford, or Pepperdine, you’re going to have to learn the same topics.

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To MBA or Not To MBA?

MBAThat is the question – and one that I get asked, now that I have completed my MBA, often.

To start, we must all understand what an MBA degree is.  As defined formally, “the Master of Business Administration (MBA or M.B.A.) is a master’s degree in business administration, which attracts people from a wide range of academic disciplines. The MBA designation originated in the United States, emerging from the late 19th century as the country industrialized and companies sought out scientific approaches to management. The core courses in the MBA program are designed to introduce students to the various areas of business such as accounting, finance, marketing, human resources, operations management, etc.”

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Life’s Resets…

If there is one thing that I have come to learn, accept, and expect throughout my life, it’s that, whether in a personal or professional capacity, people will experience what I call, “life’s resets”.  In fact, people will experience many of them and in some cases cause them.  Basically – this is something that throws your whole world upside down – a S.E.E. (significant emotional experience), if you will.  Often, these are things that you cannot prepare for.  As one of my favorite song lyrics go, The real troubles in your life are apt to be things that never crossed your worried mind; the kind that blindside you at 4pm on some idle Tuesday.”

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20 Months – My Thanks to PKE 126

Written: October 21st, 2011

Dedicated to my fellow classmates in the Presidential and Key Executive MBA Program at Pepperdine University – Cohort #126.

Twenty months ago, 18 of us embarked upon a journey but unfortunately, we’d lost a couple along the way.  When we started, we had no idea who the other people were who were joining us – what they were like, what they were capable of, and, most importantly, what they wanted out of this journey.

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The First 90 Days (on a new job)

The number one question on everyone’s mind, including those running in the current GOP election, is “When will the economy get back on track?”  Of course, for the average citizen, the implication behind this question is “When will the unemployment rate reduce?” (i.e. when can I expect to find a job?). 

Keeping this on a positive note, let’s assume that you have been one of the lucky few to actually get noticed and have embarked upon the interview process.  As I’ve stated before in other posts, this, to no one’s surprise, is an employer’s market (with a few exceptions, of course).  That said, employer’s are cognizant of the fact that there is an abundance of talent available and will heavily scrutinize anyone trying to secure a position within their organization.

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The Trio of Trust

At the foundation of any real relationship, whether personal or professional, is trust.   In fact, a relationship itself cannot sustain or survive without it.  Imagine asking a friend for a favor and not trusting in the fact that they would actually deliver – what’s the point of asking in the first place?  Or, in a business transaction, when you verbally agree upon terms – if you don’t trust the other party to honor their commitment, why would you want to do business with them?  It’s a pretty straightforward concept to get your head around.

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